"Mansions, Men, Women, and the Creation of Multiple Publics in Eighteenth-Century British North America"

    All Titles

  • "Mansions, Men, Women, and the Creation of Multiple Publics in Eighteenth-Century British North America"

Dublin Core

Title

"Mansions, Men, Women, and the Creation of Multiple Publics in Eighteenth-Century British North America"

Subject

Mount Vernon

Description

The evolution of the many-roomed mansion in colonial British America permitted the creation of multiple public spaces within the house itself. Using the theoretical insights of Jurgen Habermas, Hannah Arendt, and Karen Hansen on the nature of the kinds of publics possible in the eighteenth century, this article demonstrates how real as opposed to theoretical publics arose. As outside space and mansions formed a continuum from "public public space" to "private public space," mansions permitted elite men to control "private public space." For elite men mansions provided a social geography wherein the range of alternative publics broadened. However, that process marginalized women by trivializing the ways that heterosocial social space was used and relegating female homosocial space to the mansion's political, economic, intellectual, and psychological periphery. The eighteenth-century mansion provided gendered spaces which facilitated the integration of elite men into local, provincial, and international publics but which simultaneously contributed to a wider segregation of men and women and the exclusion of women from the political, economic, and intellectual world beyond the house. In the nineteenth century these patterns would become legitimized for the middle classes through the ideology of domesticity and the notion of "separate spheres."

Creator

Jessica Kross

Publisher

Journal of Social History

Date

1999

Format

journal article

Language

eng

Additional Item Metadata

Citation

Kross, Jessica. "Mansions, Men, Women, and the Creation of Multiple Publics in Eighteenth-Century British North America." Journal of Social History, 33 2 (Winter 1999): 385-408.

Secondary Source Item Type Metadata

Collection

How to Cite this Item

Jessica Kross, ""Mansions, Men, Women, and the Creation of Multiple Publics in Eighteenth-Century British North America"," in Martha Washington, Item #153, http://marthawashington.us/items/show/153 (accessed November 13, 2018).