Letter, to Fanny Bassett Washington, June 5, 1791

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  • Letter, to Fanny Bassett Washington, June 5, 1791

Dublin Core

Title

Letter, to Fanny Bassett Washington, June 5, 1791

Creator

Martha Washington

Source

Fields, Joseph E. 'Worthy Partner': The Papers of Martha Washington. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1994

Publisher

Greenwood Press

Date

06/05/1791

Contributor

Joseph E. Fields, editor

Type

Published version of manuscript document

Additional Item Metadata

Rights Holder

Dr. Walter Ostromecki, Panorama City, CA

Citation

Fields, Joseph E. 'Worthy Partner': The Papers of Martha Washington. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1994.

Document Item Type Metadata

Text

My dear Fanny                                      Philadelphia June the 5th 1791

Your letter of the 29th of May, did not reach my hands till yesterday - I was then very sick having got cold by the change of weather; - or I would have got and sent by Hercules the silk and & - I will as soon as I am well enough to go out make the best collection I can and send it by a safe hand. I believe they are to be had in this city. As to fine muslin I have never been able to find a yard of fine Jaconet muslin in this place. nor is the Book fine - I will lay the money out in the best way I can. - 1 sent by Hercules some rufles for my little Boys bosom which I beg you will make Chariot hem - and ship them ready to sew on and send me six at a time as his old ruffles are worne to raggs - Hercules comes home to be ready for his master - I have got several things for kitchen use but - the vessel will not sail in time to be there as soon as he will - 1 also send some East India sugar - it seems to be clean and while I was in hopes it would have arrived in time to preserve and dry cherreys - 1 have had letters from the President from savanna - and expect he will be with you by this day week. I should be very happy to come on to see you and meet him but that is out of my power, I am not well enough to bear the journey - and if I was - I could not come so long a way without a gentleman - and Mr. Lear could not leave this to come with me - if you can get timothy for half a crown in town it is much cheaper than it can be had hear - the last India vessels has brought nothing but tea and nankeens and the very coarse set kind of callacos - and such muslin that sells for four and five shillings a yard - I was thinking to get some of the coarse cotton to make her under coats she must have them of some kind or other - it would be well for the major to mention it to the General - I sent to Betty Custis a pr. of stays which Mrs. Stuart says will fit her and she sent them to Mr. Snow to return to me if they will suite Miss Harriet she may as well keep them - as to have a pair made for her - I have seen no timothy hear sold for less than four & six pence and that but one piece - I got what was left and sent it to the girls.

Batt Dandridge arrived hear yesterday he is as yellow as a mulato, - he is inoculated this day for the small pox - Mr. Lear's child has got quite well, and grows finely - the children are both well - and so is all our family except myself - and god only knows wheather - I shall ever be in tolerable health again -I am sorry to hear that your little Boy is not in good health - worms is the cause of all complaints in children - I have sent three Butter printers send one of the larger ones to Mrs. Stuart and - keep the others until I come. - my love to the major - kiss the children. - and believe me my dear Fanny.

Your most affectionate
M Washington

Original Format

Autograph Letter Signed

Collection

How to Cite this Item

Martha Washington, "Letter, to Fanny Bassett Washington, June 5, 1791," in Martha Washington, Item #455, http://marthawashington.us/items/show/455 (accessed March 29, 2017).